Federal - HR 4674

A bill to amend and strengthen the Higher Education Act of 1965 to lower the cost of college for students and families, to hold colleges accountable for students' success, and to give a new generation of students the opportunity to graduate on-time and transition to a successful career.

Introduced

October 15, 2019

Description

A bill to amend and strengthen the Higher Education Act of 1965 to lower the cost of college for students and families, to hold colleges accountable for students' success, and to give a new generation of students the opportunity to graduate on-time and transition to a successful career.

Our Position

Monitoring

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 157

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Dec. 28, 2020 — Reported to the House amended by the House Education and Labor Committee and placed on the Union Calendar. H Rept 116-700Congressional Record p. H9166

  • June 15, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Sherrill, (D-N.J.)
  • April 24, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Butterfield, (D-N.C.)
  • March 9, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    McEachin, (D-Va.)
  • March 4, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Davids, (D-Kan.)Neal, (D-Mass.)
  • March 2, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Kirkpatrick, (D-Ariz.)
  • Feb. 21, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    DeGette, (D-Colo.)Foster, (D-Ill.)
    Doggett, (D-Texas)Moulton, (D-Mass.)
  • Feb. 18, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Cox, (D-Calif.)
  • Feb. 12, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Krishnamoorthi, (D-Ill.)Lofgren, (D-Calif.)Vargas, (D-Calif.)
  • Feb. 10, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Kelly, R. (D-Ill.)
  • Feb. 5, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Velazquez, (D-N.Y.)
  • Feb. 4, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Bustos, (D-Ill.)
  • Feb. 3, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Connolly, (D-Va.)Johnson, H. (D-Ga.)
  • Jan. 30, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cuellar, (D-Texas)McBath, (D-Ga.)
  • Jan. 28, 2020 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Wexton, (D-Va.)
  • Dec. 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    McCollum, (D-Minn.)
  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Lieu, (D-Calif.)Sherman, (D-Calif.)
  • Dec. 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cohen, (D-Tenn.)Craig, (D-Minn.)
  • Dec. 17, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Jeffries, (D-N.Y.)
  • Dec. 13, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Cardenas, (D-Calif.)
  • Dec. 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 12

    Crow, (D-Colo.)Maloney, C. (D-N.Y.)Scott, D. (D-Ga.)
    Jackson Lee, (D-Texas)Rouda, (D-Calif.)Thompson, B. (D-Miss.)
    Lawson, (D-Fla.)Roybal-Allard, (D-Calif.)Veasey, (D-Texas)
    Lynch, (D-Mass.)Rush, (D-Ill.)Yarmuth, (D-Ky.)
  • Dec. 5, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Cartwright, (D-Pa.)Sanchez, (D-Calif.)Smith, Adam (D-Wash.)
    Perlmutter, (D-Colo.)Schakowsky, (D-Ill.)
  • Dec. 3, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Kim, (D-N.J.)
  • Nov. 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Bishop, S. (D-Ga.)Kuster, (D-N.H.)Underwood, (D-Ill.)
    Horsford, (D-Nev.)Levin, (D-Calif.)
  • Nov. 22, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Gomez, (D-Calif.)Kildee, (D-Mich.)Luria, (D-Va.)
  • Nov. 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Johnson, E.B. (D-Texas)Slotkin, (D-Mich.)
  • Nov. 20, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Clark, K. (D-Mass.)DeFazio, (D-Ore.)Suozzi, (D-N.Y.)
    Dean, (D-Pa.)Engel, (D-N.Y.)
  • Nov. 18, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    DelBene, (D-Wash.)Pascrell (D-N.J.)Serrano, (D-N.Y.)
    Nadler, (D-N.Y.)Pocan, (D-Wis.)Wasserman Schultz, (D-Fla.)
  • Nov. 13, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Clarke, Y. (D-N.Y.)Crist, (D-Fla.)Lawrence, (D-Mich.)
  • Nov. 12, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Casten, (D-Ill.)Sires, (D-N.J.)
  • Nov. 5, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Cleaver (D-Mo.)Gallego, (D-Ariz.)
  • Nov. 1, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 21

    Blumenauer, (D-Ore.)Garcia, (D-Texas)Pappas, (D-N.H.)
    Boyle, (D-Pa.)Huffman, (D-Calif.)Price, (D-N.C.)
    Brownley, (D-Calif.)Keating, (D-Mass.)Raskin, (D-Md.)
    Carbajal, (D-Calif.)Kennedy, Joseph P. (D-Mass.)Richmond, (D-La.)
    Cisneros, (D-Calif.)Lewis, John (D-Ga.)Ryan, T. (D-Ohio)
    Dingell, (D-Mich.)Lujan, B.R. (D-N.M.)Soto, (D-Fla.)
    Eshoo, (D-Calif.)Moore, (D-Wis.)Waters, Maxine (D-Calif.)
  • Oct. 31, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Education and Labor Committee.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — En Bloc Amendments

    En bloc amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment by:

    -- Shalala, D-Fla., that would direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default and report to the House Education and Labor Committee and the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, any recommendations deemed appropriate.

    -- Thompson, R-Pa., that would include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program included in the legislation.

    As amended, it also would clarify that the term career and technical education would be based on the definition in the 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs.(PL 109-270).

    En bloc amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment by:

    -- Shalala, D-Fla., that would direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default and report to the House Education and Labor Committee and the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, any recommendations deemed appropriate.

    -- Thompson, R-Pa., that would include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program included in the legislation.

    As amended, it also would clarify that the term career and technical education would be based on the definition in the 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs.(PL 109-270).

    Adopted (en bloc, as amended) 45-0.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — For-Profit Pell Grant Access
      G. Thompson, R-Pa. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would change the definition of eligible institution in the bill for expanded Pell Grants to include proprietary, for-profit institutions of higher education.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would change the definition of eligible institution in the bill for expanded Pell Grants to include proprietary, for-profit institutions of higher education.

    Rejected 20-25.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Aid for Undocumented Immigrants
      Allen, R-Ga. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would define an institution of higher education for the purpose of receiving aid under the bill, as an institution that does not offer in-state tuition or fee rate to an undocumented immigrant, who is not lawfully present in the U.S.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would define an institution of higher education for the purpose of receiving aid under the bill, as an institution that does not offer in-state tuition or fee rate to an undocumented immigrant, who is not lawfully present in the U.S.

    Rejected 19-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Crimes Against Children
      Comer, R-Ky. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the Education secretary from canceling any amount of loan, interest or principal under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program for eligible borrowers convicted of a crime against children.

    The amendment also would allow the secretary to determine what constitutes a crime against a child.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the Education secretary from canceling any amount of loan, interest or principal under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program for eligible borrowers convicted of a crime against children.

    The amendment also would allow the secretary to determine what constitutes a crime against a child.

    Rejected 20-24.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Impact on Veterans
      Banks, R-Ind. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would delay the bill's enactment until the Education secretary certifies to Congress that the bill would not negatively affect the recruitment and preparedness of members of the Armed Forces or limit veterans' access to higher education.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would delay the bill's enactment until the Education secretary certifies to Congress that the bill would not negatively affect the recruitment and preparedness of members of the Armed Forces or limit veterans' access to higher education.

    Rejected 20-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Academic Cooperation
      Grothman, R-Wis. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would restrict language and area centers receiving grant funding from participating in "academic cooperation" with any foreign countries within the center or program's purview that would restrict or limit the foreign academic opportunities of the students, faculty, or staff.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would restrict language and area centers receiving grant funding from participating in "academic cooperation" with any foreign countries within the center or program's purview that would restrict or limit the foreign academic opportunities of the students, faculty, or staff.

    Rejected 20-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Institutionally Determined Loan Limits
      Grothman, R-Wis. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow institutions to limit the amount of loans a student can borrow for an academic year.

    The amendment also would require that the institution demonstrate that the average amount of student loan debt for the program the student is enrolled in will be excessive based on expected starting salary

    It also would allow the student to appeal the loan limitation determination by the school.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow institutions to limit the amount of loans a student can borrow for an academic year.

    The amendment also would require that the institution demonstrate that the average amount of student loan debt for the program the student is enrolled in will be excessive based on expected starting salary

    It also would allow the student to appeal the loan limitation determination by the school.

    Rejected 21-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Nutritional Assistance Benefits
      Grothman, R-Wis. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove language from the bill that would require institutions to make information available to students about the availability of nutritional assistance benefits, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove language from the bill that would require institutions to make information available to students about the availability of nutritional assistance benefits, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

    Rejected 21-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Cooperation with Immigration Enforcement
      Allen, R-Ga. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require states to certify as a condition of receiving funding under the bill, that neither it nor its political subdivisions limit cooperation with federal immigration agents in order to protect undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully present in the U.S.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require states to certify as a condition of receiving funding under the bill, that neither it nor its political subdivisions limit cooperation with federal immigration agents in order to protect undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully present in the U.S.

    Rejected 21-25.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — State Workforce Incentive Program
      Stefanik, R-N.Y. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would eliminate the current Public Service Loan Forgiveness program and implement a new State Workforce Incentive program which would allocate loan repayment credits to states that develop a plan showing high-need employment areas and civil service positions within the state. Under the plan, students in the state who enter fields marked as high-need or in civil service would be eligible to receive loan repayment credits up to $50,000. If the loan repayment credits would exceed $50,000, the Education secretary would cancel the outstanding balance of the borrower.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would eliminate the current Public Service Loan Forgiveness program and implement a new State Workforce Incentive program which would allocate loan repayment credits to states that develop a plan showing high-need employment areas and civil service positions within the state. Under the plan, students in the state who enter fields marked as high-need or in civil service would be eligible to receive loan repayment credits up to $50,000. If the loan repayment credits would exceed $50,000, the Education secretary would cancel the outstanding balance of the borrower.

    Rejected 22-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Background Checks for Employees Working with Children
      Comer, R-Ky. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions receiving aid under the bill to include in their annual security report to the Education secretary, a statement of current campus policies regarding mandatory background checks for employees and volunteers.

    The amendment also would require background background checks for all employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in programs held in campus facilities.

    As amended, it would clarify that background checks would not be required for all employees and volunteers, and the provision would only apply to university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions receiving aid under the bill to include in their annual security report to the Education secretary, a statement of current campus policies regarding mandatory background checks for employees and volunteers.

    The amendment also would require background background checks for all employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in programs held in campus facilities.

    As amended, it would clarify that background checks would not be required for all employees and volunteers, and the provision would only apply to university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.

    Adopted (As amended) by voice vote.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Background Check Requirement
      Bonamici, D-Ore. —

    Amendment to the Comer, R-Ky., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would limit the requirement for background checks to only those employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in programs held in campus facilities.

    The amendment also would clarify that the requirement for background checks only applies to university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.

    Amendment to the Comer, R-Ky., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would limit the requirement for background checks to only those employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in programs held in campus facilities.

    The amendment also would clarify that the requirement for background checks only applies to university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.

    Adopted 26-22.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Religious Exemptions
      Comer, R-Ky. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif, substitute amendment that would strike language from the bill that would amend Title IX of the 1972 higher education law (PL 92-318) that prohibits institutions from discriminating on the basis of sex, to require institutions that exercise a religious exemption to Title IX, to submit in writing to the assistant secretary for civil rights a statement identifying the provision that conflicts with a specific tenant of the religious organization.

    The amendment also would remove language from the that would require the institution publish the letter on its website in a prominent location.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif, substitute amendment that would strike language from the bill that would amend Title IX of the 1972 higher education law (PL 92-318) that prohibits institutions from discriminating on the basis of sex, to require institutions that exercise a religious exemption to Title IX, to submit in writing to the assistant secretary for civil rights a statement identifying the provision that conflicts with a specific tenant of the religious organization.

    The amendment also would remove language from the that would require the institution publish the letter on its website in a prominent location.

    Rejected 22-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Accreditation Board Business Representation
      Johnson, R-S.D. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require that the working groups for accrediting agency recognition, established under the bill, include at least one member from business as one of the public representatives.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require that the working groups for accrediting agency recognition, established under the bill, include at least one member from business as one of the public representatives.

    Rejected 23-25.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Health Care for Infants Born Alive
      Johnson, R-S.D. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to certify to the Education secretary that affiliated healthcare facilities will ensure that medical care is provided to infants born alive, in order to be eligible to receive aid authorized in the bill.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to certify to the Education secretary that affiliated healthcare facilities will ensure that medical care is provided to infants born alive, in order to be eligible to receive aid authorized in the bill.

    Rejected 22-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Gainful Employment Requirements
      Fulcher, R-Idaho —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would strike the bill's provision requiring the Education secretary to establish gainful employment in a recognized occupation requirements for training programs authorized in the legislation, including performance metrics that at a minimum establish the requirements for a debt-to-earnings rate that serves the best interests of students and taxpayers.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would strike the bill's provision requiring the Education secretary to establish gainful employment in a recognized occupation requirements for training programs authorized in the legislation, including performance metrics that at a minimum establish the requirements for a debt-to-earnings rate that serves the best interests of students and taxpayers.

    Rejected 22-25.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Qualified Savings Account Distributions
      Walker, R-N.C. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would include qualified distributions from a qualified tuition program, as defined in section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, owned by a student or a student's parents, not subject to federal income tax, in the bill's definition of changes to untaxed income and benefits.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would include qualified distributions from a qualified tuition program, as defined in section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, owned by a student or a student's parents, not subject to federal income tax, in the bill's definition of changes to untaxed income and benefits.

    Rejected 22-26.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — En Bloc Amendments

    En bloc amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment offered by:

    -- Cline, R-Va., that would change adjusted cohort default rate everywhere it appears in the bill and replace it with adjusted programmatic cohort default rate, which would change requirements throughout the bill to calculate cohort default rates to calculate program-specific cohort default rates. The adjusted programmatic cohort default rate would calculate loan repayment rate based on program-by-program rate instead of the rate for the entire institution. A high cohort default rate can jeopardize access to aid and require the institution to implement a loan default prevention plan.

    -- Meuser, R-Pa., that would allow any institution of higher education, not just covered institution included in the bill, with an adjusted cohort default rate that is greater than 20 percent for the first fiscal year rates are published by the Education secretary, to request that any determination of ineligibility not be based on the adjusted cohort default rate for any or all of the first three fiscal years rates are published.

    En bloc amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment offered by:

    -- Cline, R-Va., that would change adjusted cohort default rate everywhere it appears in the bill and replace it with adjusted programmatic cohort default rate, which would change requirements throughout the bill to calculate cohort default rates to calculate program-specific cohort default rates. The adjusted programmatic cohort default rate would calculate loan repayment rate based on program-by-program rate instead of the rate for the entire institution. A high cohort default rate can jeopardize access to aid and require the institution to implement a loan default prevention plan.

    -- Meuser, R-Pa., that would allow any institution of higher education, not just covered institution included in the bill, with an adjusted cohort default rate that is greater than 20 percent for the first fiscal year rates are published by the Education secretary, to request that any determination of ineligibility not be based on the adjusted cohort default rate for any or all of the first three fiscal years rates are published.

    Rejected (en bloc) 22-24.

    Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Alternative Accreditation
      Cline, R-Va. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would amend the 1965 higher education law (PL 89-329) that aims to strengthen the educational resources of U.S. colleges and universities, to add a definition for alternative accreditation for institutions of higher education.

    The amendment would specify that an institution that is accredited by an authorized alternative accreditation authority in a state that has an agreement with the Education secretary may be included as an institution of higher education and be eligible to participate in title IV financial aid programs, including the following institutions:

    • An institution that provides post-secondary education.
    • A postsecondary apprenticeship program.
    • A postsecondary education course or program provided by an institution of postsecondary education, a non-profit organization, or a for-profit organization.

    It also would remove language from the bill related to the federal direct loan program, and terminate the authority to make new loans under this program after June 30, 2022.

    The amendment also would replace the current federal direct loan program with a new federal direct simplification loan program, beginning with award year 2022.

    It also would specify that the maximum amount of loans a student may borrow in an academic year would be $7,500 for an undergraduate student and $12,500 for a graduate or professional student. It also would allow undergraduate students 15 years to repay a loan, and graduate or professional students 25 years. It also would authorize an institution to limit loan amounts to no more than the tuition and fees at the institution.

    The amendment also would phase out loan forgiveness authority for a federal direct simplification loan by prohibiting income contingent repayment plans. It also would not allow the secretary to cancel any outstanding balance of interest due on any loan beginning on or after July 1, 2022, unless the borrowers first loan was made prior to the date.

    It also would amend current law to require greater accountability by the institution for student loans by imposing a fine on schools with a high default rate, as determined by the secretary.

    It also would add a section on title IV eligibility requirements that would amend the law to require the institutions to publish on its website on an annual basis, the information on eligibility for title IV loans at the institution. It also would require the institutions to publish information regarding:

    • The percentage and number of students enrolled at the institution or in the program of study who receive federal grant aid, federal student loans, state grant aid, institutional grants, or a student loan from a state.
    • Student body enrollment status.
    • Information about students that includes the percentage of students who transfer, the percentage of students who complete the program of study in which they initially enroll in, and the average length of time for a student to complete a program of study.
    • Default and non-repayment rates.

    It also would remove language from the bill regarding program integrity of student assistance programs and insert language on accreditation reform.

    It also would allow states to establish alternative systems of accreditation for the purpose of establishing institutions that provide postsecondary education as eligible for funding under title IV, if the state submits a plan to the secretary for the establishment of the system. It also would require the plan submitted to include the following information:

    • The plan for designating accrediting entities within the state.
    • Standards or criteria that an institution that provides postsecondary education must meet in order to receive an initial accreditation as a part of the alternative accreditation system.
    • A description of the appeals process through which an institution that allows a postsecondary education program may appeal to an accrediting entity if the program is denied accreditation under the system.
    • Any state policy regarding public accessibility to information relating to institutions that provide education programs accredited under the system.
    • The states definition of a postsecondary certification, credential, or degree.
    • Agreements that the state will enter into with institutions that provide postsecondary education that is accredited by the systems.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would amend the 1965 higher education law (PL 89-329) that aims to strengthen the educational resources of U.S. colleges and universities, to add a definition for alternative accreditation for institutions of higher education.

    The amendment would specify that an institution that is accredited by an authorized alternative accreditation authority in a state that has an agreement with the Education secretary may be included as an institution of higher education and be eligible to participate in title IV financial aid programs, including the following institutions:

    • An institution that provides post-secondary education.
    • A postsecondary apprenticeship program.
    • A postsecondary education course or program provided by an institution of postsecondary education, a non-profit organization, or a for-profit organization.
    • It also would remove language from the bill related to the federal direct loan program, and terminate the authority to make new loans under this program after June 30, 2022.

      The amendment also would replace the current federal direct loan program with a new federal direct simplification loan program, beginning with award year 2022.

      It also would specify that the maximum amount of loans a student may borrow in an academic year would be $7,500 for an undergraduate student and $12,500 for a graduate or professional student. It also would allow undergraduate students 15 years to repay a loan, and graduate or professional students 25 years. It also would authorize an institution to limit loan amounts to no more than the tuition and fees at the institution.

      The amendment also would phase out loan forgiveness authority for a federal direct simplification loan by prohibiting income contingent repayment plans. It also would not allow the secretary to cancel any outstanding balance of interest due on any loan beginning on or after July 1, 2022, unless the borrowers first loan was made prior to the date.

      It also would amend current law to require greater accountability by the institution for student loans by imposing a fine on schools with a high default rate, as determined by the secretary.

      It also would add a section on title IV eligibility requirements that would amend the law to require the institutions to publish on its website on an annual basis, the information on eligibility for title IV loans at the institution. It also would require the institutions to publish information regarding:

    • The percentage and number of students enrolled at the institution or in the program of study who receive federal grant aid, federal student loans, state grant aid, institutional grants, or a student loan from a state.
    • Student body enrollment status.
    • Information about students that includes the percentage of students who transfer, the percentage of students who complete the program of study in which they initially enroll in, and the average length of time for a student to complete a program of study.
    • Default and non-repayment rates.
    • It also would remove language from the bill regarding program integrity of student assistance programs and insert language on accreditation reform.

      It also would allow states to establish alternative systems of accreditation for the purpose of establishing institutions that provide postsecondary education as eligible for funding under title IV, if the state submits a plan to the secretary for the establishment of the system. It also would require the plan submitted to include the following information:

    • The plan for designating accrediting entities within the state.
    • Standards or criteria that an institution that provides postsecondary education must meet in order to receive an initial accreditation as a part of the alternative accreditation system.
    • A description of the appeals process through which an institution that allows a postsecondary education program may appeal to an accrediting entity if the program is denied accreditation under the system.
    • Any state policy regarding public accessibility to information relating to institutions that provide education programs accredited under the system.
    • The states definition of a postsecondary certification, credential, or degree.
    • Agreements that the state will enter into with institutions that provide postsecondary education that is accredited by the systems.
    • Rejected 9-37.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Accreditation Requirements Removal
        Watkins, R-Kan. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove certain requirements for accreditation in the bill, including measures related to course completion, progress towards completion, and workforce participation.

      The amendment also would remove language from the bill that would require the secretary to direct the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity to regularly evaluate the effectiveness of performance benchmarks established by accrediting agencies.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove certain requirements for accreditation in the bill, including measures related to course completion, progress towards completion, and workforce participation.

      The amendment also would remove language from the bill that would require the secretary to direct the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity to regularly evaluate the effectiveness of performance benchmarks established by accrediting agencies.

      Rejected 22-26.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
        Meuser, R-Pa. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment which would remove from the bill a requirement that the Education secretary coordinate with the private education loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to assist borrowers seeking to resolve complaints related to their private education or federal student loans.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment which would remove from the bill a requirement that the Education secretary coordinate with the private education loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to assist borrowers seeking to resolve complaints related to their private education or federal student loans.

      Rejected 22-26.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Quality Assurance Programs
        Keller, R-Pa. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would repeal current law requirements regarding Quality Assurance Program participation agreements that institutions must enter into with the Education secretary in order to be considered an eligible institution for participation in student aid programs.

      It also would repeal a subsection of current law regarding the requirement that proprietary institutions of higher education must allocate no less than ten percent of its revenues towards student financial aid from sources other than funds provided by the Quality Assurance Program agreement, or else be subject to sanctions. The sanctions include ineligibility of the institution to participate in the aid programs for no less than two years.

      It also would repeal from the bill, a subsection which outlines the implementation of the proprietary institutions using non-program funds. The language removed from the bill would outline the non-program funds that are able to be used by the proprietary institutions to to pay tuition expenses. The non-program funds include funds generated from:

      • Any institutional charges for students enrolled in the program.
      • Activities conducted that are necessary for training and education of the institutions students.
      • Funds paid by the student for a program that is not eligible for funds under the title.
      • Institutional aid from loans.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would repeal current law requirements regarding Quality Assurance Program participation agreements that institutions must enter into with the Education secretary in order to be considered an eligible institution for participation in student aid programs.

      It also would repeal a subsection of current law regarding the requirement that proprietary institutions of higher education must allocate no less than ten percent of its revenues towards student financial aid from sources other than funds provided by the Quality Assurance Program agreement, or else be subject to sanctions. The sanctions include ineligibility of the institution to participate in the aid programs for no less than two years.

      It also would repeal from the bill, a subsection which outlines the implementation of the proprietary institutions using non-program funds. The language removed from the bill would outline the non-program funds that are able to be used by the proprietary institutions to to pay tuition expenses. The non-program funds include funds generated from:

    • Any institutional charges for students enrolled in the program.
    • Activities conducted that are necessary for training and education of the institutions students.
    • Funds paid by the student for a program that is not eligible for funds under the title.
    • Institutional aid from loans.
    • Rejected 22-26.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Non-Eligible Institutions Partnerships
        Keller, R-Pa. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow non-eligible institutions under the bill that partner with eligible institutions via a written arrangement to provide an educational program to students in the eligible institution and be eligible to participate in student financial aid programs as long as certain requirements are met, including that the ineligible institution or organization provide 25 percent or less of the educational program.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow non-eligible institutions under the bill that partner with eligible institutions via a written arrangement to provide an educational program to students in the eligible institution and be eligible to participate in student financial aid programs as long as certain requirements are met, including that the ineligible institution or organization provide 25 percent or less of the educational program.

      Rejected 22-26.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Professor Political Biases
        Murphy, R-N.C. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would express the sense of Congress that professors at higher education institutions have become unnecessarily political, and that they should strive to remove their political biases from the classroom.

      The amendment also would express the sense of Congress that should political conversations take place during instructional hours, professors should allow for the expression of a wide and diverse range of political views.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would express the sense of Congress that professors at higher education institutions have become unnecessarily political, and that they should strive to remove their political biases from the classroom.

      The amendment also would express the sense of Congress that should political conversations take place during instructional hours, professors should allow for the expression of a wide and diverse range of political views.

      Rejected 22-26.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Spending Increase Transparency
        Murphy, R-N.C. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions of higher education whose non-instructional spending increases by more than 5 percent (using year-to-year data) disclose the increase to students and prospective students, with an analysis of how the increases are expected to impact tuition.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions of higher education whose non-instructional spending increases by more than 5 percent (using year-to-year data) disclose the increase to students and prospective students, with an analysis of how the increases are expected to impact tuition.

      Adopted 47-0.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Republican Substitute
        Foxx, R-N.C. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the Education secretary implementing a ratings system to evaluate the performance of higher education programs.

      The amendment also would express the sense of Congress that no higher education institutions that directly or indirectly receives financial assistance should restrict the free speech rights of students through restrictive speech codes or free speech zones. Higher education institutions would be required to disclose to prospective students current policies related to free speech on campus.

      It also would revise current law to provide a single definition of institutions of higher education eligible for federal grant and loans which would include for-profit and proprietary schools, with limitations.

      The also would require higher education institutions to report foreign ownership or foreign gifts totaling $50,000 or more in value to the Education secretary.

      The amendment also would direct any institution participating in a program under the bill to implement an evidence-based program to prevent substance abuse by students and employees. This effort would require the Education secretary in consultation with the secretary of Health and Human Services to determine best practices for preventing substance abuse on campuses. These practices would be available to institutions if requested.

      The amendment also would prohibit the distribution of any funds to institutions that do not afford the same rights to religious student organizations that are afforded to other student organizations at the institution.

      It also would prohibit the distribution of funds to institutions that take adverse actions against students participating in single-sex organizations at the institution based solely on preventing the opposite sex from participating in that organization. The amendment would define adverse actions as any disciplinary action, coercive action, or sanction taken by the institution.

      The amendment also would prohibit the distribution of funds to institutions that prevent the Department of Homeland Security from recruiting prospective employees on campus.

      The amendment also would direct Education secretary to develop a task force in conjunction with the Defense secretary and the director of national of National Intelligence to examine the threat of foreign nationals accessing valuable information at American higher education institutions. The task force would identify research projects taking place at higher education institutions that are sensitive to U.S. national security and instruct the institution on how to properly secure the information against foreign access.

      The amendment also would require students who are citizens of China, North Korea, Russia, or Iran to have their participation in any project deemed sensitive to national security approved by the director of National Intelligence and also be required to secure a background check.

      It also would direct the Education secretary to develop a College Dashboard website, which would display national statistics regarding graduation rates, enrollment statistics, pricing, and average student loan debt for various types of institutions.

      The amendment also would require institutions to display a net price calculator in the section of their website where pricing information would normally be displayed. The calculator would inform prospective students of the total annual cost of attending the institution.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary and the chief operating officer at the Department of Education to collect and publish information regarding the performance of student loan programs, including the number of borrowers who successfully paid off their loans and the number of students who entered deferment or forbearance.

      It also would require campus climate surveys on sexual assault, to include the general climate of the campus regarding the institution's treatment of sexual assault. It also would allow each institution to establish the standard of evidence to be used in disciplinary hearings regarding sexual assault.

      It also would require institutions to retain the services of qualified sexual assault survivors' counselors and make available to victims of sexual assault a form detailing relevant medical and legal options available.

      It also would encourage institutions to develop a memorandum of understanding between the school and local law enforcement regarding cooperation in on-campus sexual assault investigations.

      It also would establish a grant program for earn-and-learn programs in which students enter into partnership with private sector entities for apprenticeships. The program must last no longer than 2 years and the entity administering the program must provide matching funds of no less than 50% the amount of the grant.

      The amendment directs institutions that use grant funds to establish or increase an endowment fund to use the proceeds from the fund to develop customized instructional courses, career and technical education programs, and dual or concurrent enrollment programs.

      The amendment also would establish a grant program to improve postsecondary access and completion rates for qualified individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. The grants could be ued to fund so called "pay-for-success" programs that allow third-party investors to put up capital for the program, and are reimbursed if the venture proves successful.

      The amendment also would expand the job location and development program included in the bill which would allow institutions to use funds to expand apprenticeship programs for students to assist employers and would remove language from the bill that would allow the use of these funds for community service jobs.

      The amendment also would restrict institutions to using only 20% of the funds allocated in a fiscal year for the completion grant program, which would provide funds to students who are at-risk of dropping out of the institution. The amendment also would specify that these grants are only available to students in financial need, and would require the institutions to submit a report to the Department of Education detailing the success of these completion grants.

      The amendment also would terminate the current Federal Direct Loan Program and prohibit any new loans being issued after Sept. 30, 2026.

      The amendment also would establish a new ONE Loan Program, which would provide financial aid loans to institutions that apply to the secretary for inclusion in the program. It also would establish new loan limits and interest rates.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary to develop a plain language disclosure form to distribute information regarding loans to student borrowers. The form will contain the total cost of the loan and the estimated monthly repayment.

      The amendment would require institutions that participate in programs under the bill to make timely reports to the campus community on crimes reported to campus officials that pose an ongoing threat. Institutions could delay releasing a report if it would comprise an ongoing investigation.

      It also would establish a process for institutional disciplinary action that would provide relevant parties with written notice of the allegations two weeks prior to the start of disciplinary proceedings. It also would specify that the written notice include a description of rights and the details of the allegation. It also would allow parties to the proceedings to have access to material evidence one week prior to the start of disciplinary proceedings.

      The amendment also would require institutions to implement a campus fire safety report, which would establish safety practices and standards of the institution regarding fire safety. It also would require institutions to develop a missing student policy for students who live in on-campus housing.

      It also would require institutions extending a financial aid offer to include a standardized quick reference box, which would include important information on the cost of the college and the financial aid provided.

      The amendment also would recommend that institutions have clear policies prohibiting hazing on campus and to clearly display these policies to students and faculty.

      The amendment also would requires institution to develop an online estimator tool for students to receive approximations of grants, loans, or work study assistance they could be eligible to receive.

      It also would direct the secretary to award contracts for student loan servicing and collection. It also would require that companies awarded contracts must have relevant expertise and demonstrated effectiveness in the area of loan servicing and collection.

      It also would establish the Commission on Institutional Responsibilities Concerning Federal Student Aid, which would be directed to examine ways in which institutions could bear the societal costs of student loan defaults. It also would direct the commission to recommend legislative and regulatory measures that would improve institutional performance regarding student loans.

      The amendment also would create State Workforce Incentive Plan, designed to provide loan repayment credits to states that develop a plan for encouraging employment in high-need or public service occupations specific to the individual state. The loan repayment credits would be allocated to borrowers who plan on pursuing careers in those designated areas.

      The amendment also would prohibit the Department of Education from proposing any regulations regarding states authorizing institutions of higher education.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary to enter into a partnership with an eligible entity to create a coordination center which would develop and implement a comprehensive transition and postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities.

      The amendment would also establish an independent commission to develop guidelines for accessing postsecondary electronic instruction materials to improve access to educational benefits for disabled students

      The amendment also would repeal several current higher education programs, including the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship program and the Thurgood Marshall Legal Educational Opportunity Program and the public service loan forgiveness program.

      It also would repeal the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) which provides grants to support innovative programs to improve education outcomes.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the Education secretary implementing a ratings system to evaluate the performance of higher education programs.

      The amendment also would express the sense of Congress that no higher education institutions that directly or indirectly receives financial assistance should restrict the free speech rights of students through restrictive speech codes or free speech zones. Higher education institutions would be required to disclose to prospective students current policies related to free speech on campus.

      It also would revise current law to provide a single definition of institutions of higher education eligible for federal grant and loans which would include for-profit and proprietary schools, with limitations.

      The also would require higher education institutions to report foreign ownership or foreign gifts totaling $50,000 or more in value to the Education secretary.

      The amendment also would direct any institution participating in a program under the bill to implement an evidence-based program to prevent substance abuse by students and employees. This effort would require the Education secretary in consultation with the secretary of Health and Human Services to determine best practices for preventing substance abuse on campuses. These practices would be available to institutions if requested.

      The amendment also would prohibit the distribution of any funds to institutions that do not afford the same rights to religious student organizations that are afforded to other student organizations at the institution.

      It also would prohibit the distribution of funds to institutions that take adverse actions against students participating in single-sex organizations at the institution based solely on preventing the opposite sex from participating in that organization. The amendment would define adverse actions as any disciplinary action, coercive action, or sanction taken by the institution.

      The amendment also would prohibit the distribution of funds to institutions that prevent the Department of Homeland Security from recruiting prospective employees on campus.

      The amendment also would direct Education secretary to develop a task force in conjunction with the Defense secretary and the director of national of National Intelligence to examine the threat of foreign nationals accessing valuable information at American higher education institutions. The task force would identify research projects taking place at higher education institutions that are sensitive to U.S. national security and instruct the institution on how to properly secure the information against foreign access.

      The amendment also would require students who are citizens of China, North Korea, Russia, or Iran to have their participation in any project deemed sensitive to national security approved by the director of National Intelligence and also be required to secure a background check.

      It also would direct the Education secretary to develop a College Dashboard website, which would display national statistics regarding graduation rates, enrollment statistics, pricing, and average student loan debt for various types of institutions.

      The amendment also would require institutions to display a net price calculator in the section of their website where pricing information would normally be displayed. The calculator would inform prospective students of the total annual cost of attending the institution.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary and the chief operating officer at the Department of Education to collect and publish information regarding the performance of student loan programs, including the number of borrowers who successfully paid off their loans and the number of students who entered deferment or forbearance.

      It also would require campus climate surveys on sexual assault, to include the general climate of the campus regarding the institution's treatment of sexual assault. It also would allow each institution to establish the standard of evidence to be used in disciplinary hearings regarding sexual assault.

      It also would require institutions to retain the services of qualified sexual assault survivors' counselors and make available to victims of sexual assault a form detailing relevant medical and legal options available.

      It also would encourage institutions to develop a memorandum of understanding between the school and local law enforcement regarding cooperation in on-campus sexual assault investigations.

      It also would establish a grant program for earn-and-learn programs in which students enter into partnership with private sector entities for apprenticeships. The program must last no longer than 2 years and the entity administering the program must provide matching funds of no less than 50% the amount of the grant.

      The amendment directs institutions that use grant funds to establish or increase an endowment fund to use the proceeds from the fund to develop customized instructional courses, career and technical education programs, and dual or concurrent enrollment programs.

      The amendment also would establish a grant program to improve postsecondary access and completion rates for qualified individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. The grants could be ued to fund so called "pay-for-success" programs that allow third-party investors to put up capital for the program, and are reimbursed if the venture proves successful.

      The amendment also would expand the job location and development program included in the bill which would allow institutions to use funds to expand apprenticeship programs for students to assist employers and would remove language from the bill that would allow the use of these funds for community service jobs.

      The amendment also would restrict institutions to using only 20% of the funds allocated in a fiscal year for the completion grant program, which would provide funds to students who are at-risk of dropping out of the institution. The amendment also would specify that these grants are only available to students in financial need, and would require the institutions to submit a report to the Department of Education detailing the success of these completion grants.

      The amendment also would terminate the current Federal Direct Loan Program and prohibit any new loans being issued after Sept. 30, 2026.

      The amendment also would establish a new ONE Loan Program, which would provide financial aid loans to institutions that apply to the secretary for inclusion in the program. It also would establish new loan limits and interest rates.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary to develop a plain language disclosure form to distribute information regarding loans to student borrowers. The form will contain the total cost of the loan and the estimated monthly repayment.

      The amendment would require institutions that participate in programs under the bill to make timely reports to the campus community on crimes reported to campus officials that pose an ongoing threat. Institutions could delay releasing a report if it would comprise an ongoing investigation.

      It also would establish a process for institutional disciplinary action that would provide relevant parties with written notice of the allegations two weeks prior to the start of disciplinary proceedings. It also would specify that the written notice include a description of rights and the details of the allegation. It also would allow parties to the proceedings to have access to material evidence one week prior to the start of disciplinary proceedings.

      The amendment also would require institutions to implement a campus fire safety report, which would establish safety practices and standards of the institution regarding fire safety. It also would require institutions to develop a missing student policy for students who live in on-campus housing.

      It also would require institutions extending a financial aid offer to include a standardized quick reference box, which would include important information on the cost of the college and the financial aid provided.

      The amendment also would recommend that institutions have clear policies prohibiting hazing on campus and to clearly display these policies to students and faculty.

      The amendment also would requires institution to develop an online estimator tool for students to receive approximations of grants, loans, or work study assistance they could be eligible to receive.

      It also would direct the secretary to award contracts for student loan servicing and collection. It also would require that companies awarded contracts must have relevant expertise and demonstrated effectiveness in the area of loan servicing and collection.

      It also would establish the Commission on Institutional Responsibilities Concerning Federal Student Aid, which would be directed to examine ways in which institutions could bear the societal costs of student loan defaults. It also would direct the commission to recommend legislative and regulatory measures that would improve institutional performance regarding student loans.

      The amendment also would create State Workforce Incentive Plan, designed to provide loan repayment credits to states that develop a plan for encouraging employment in high-need or public service occupations specific to the individual state. The loan repayment credits would be allocated to borrowers who plan on pursuing careers in those designated areas.

      The amendment also would prohibit the Department of Education from proposing any regulations regarding states authorizing institutions of higher education.

      The amendment also would direct the secretary to enter into a partnership with an eligible entity to create a coordination center which would develop and implement a comprehensive transition and postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities.

      The amendment would also establish an independent commission to develop guidelines for accessing postsecondary electronic instruction materials to improve access to educational benefits for disabled students

      The amendment also would repeal several current higher education programs, including the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship program and the Thurgood Marshall Legal Educational Opportunity Program and the public service loan forgiveness program.

      It also would repeal the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) which provides grants to support innovative programs to improve education outcomes.

      Rejected 21-27.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Substitute Amendment
        S. Davis, D-Calif. —

      Substitute amendment that would:

      • Increase the maximum Pell Grant award by $625, rather than by $500.
      • Provide graduate and professional students attending public and nonprofit institutions with access to subsidized loans at the same interest rates available to these students for unsubsidized loans.
      • Replace the six-year statute of limitation on defaulted loans with a cap on collection fees charged to defaulted borrowers. It would set the caps as tiered percentages of the outstanding principal and interest on a loan reflecting first, second, third and fourth or subsequent collection efforts.
      • Change the definition of part-time faculty to make faculty members or instructors who teach a minimum of two courses and are not employed full-time anywhere else eligible for public service loan forgiveness.
      • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal financial assistance from using such assistance to carry out any action that discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth, a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth or sex stereotype.
      • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal funds from taking adverse action against students who join single-gender organizations.
      • Require the Education secretary to discharge a parent's liability on a loan by repaying the amount owed on the loan if the student becomes permanently and totally disabled or is unable to participate in substantially gainful activity.
      • Require institutions applying for aid for work-learning-service programs for the first time to submit their applications five months before the application due date for returning applicants. It also would clarify that a work college must be accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the Education secretary and have operated both a work-study program and a comprehensive work-learning service program for two years.
      • Require the Education secretary to prevent any person or entity assisting a student in managing loan repayment or applying for a repayment plan from accessing the National Student Loan Data System unless that person or entity meets certain requirements, including complying with codes of conduct and using an approved device.
      • Require for-profit institutions of higher education, when calculating their non-government revenue for the purposes of meeting existing government funding versus non-government revenue ratio requirements, to consider funds generated from activities that provide industry-related skills training under contract with an independent third party, as long as certain requirements are met. It would require that the institution does not offer more than 50 percent of courses through distance education and that the institution must ensure that less than 50 percent of enrolled students are enrolled exclusively in distance courses. It also would specify that the institution must have been providing such skills training before the bill's enactment.
      • Criminalize the unauthorized access of Education Department information technology systems to obtain commercial advantage or private financial gain, with up to a five-year prison sentence or up to a $20,000 fine, or both.
      • Reauthorize funds for graduate assistance in areas of national need at $35 million annually through fiscal 2021.
      • Require the Education secretary to encourage institutions of higher education to develop and implement plans for addressing campus mental health and student suicide.
      • Reauthorize such sums as may be necessary through fiscal 2021 for the Path to Success program, which helps at-risk adults transition into productive learning environments.
      • Direct the Education secretary to study the options for disaggregating the data reported under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) by sexual orientation and gender identity.
      • Direct the Education secretary to establish an advisory commission on serving and supporting students with mental health disabilities at higher education institutions.

      As amended, the substitute amendment would:

      • Require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to eligible students about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp program, and how to obtain additional information on the availability of nutritional assistance.
      • Allow funds under the bill's federal state partnership grant program to be used for collaboration with industry or sector partnerships.
      • Establish a Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt.
      • Clarify that funds under the section of the bill reauthorizing the CCAMPIS program that provides support to establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students, should support evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.
      • Require net price calculators to, within one year of the bill's enactment, meet current requirements to include disclaimers stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations. The amendment also would outline new requirements for net price calculators, including: labeling, placement on the colleges website, what should be specified in the results screen, breakdown of various costs, and possible sources of aid. The amendment also would include provisions protecting the privacy of calculator users. It would, additionally, allow the secretary to develop a universal net price calculator housed within the Education department, subject to various requirements.
      • Direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.
      • Require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institution of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.
      • Direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the congressional authorizing committees examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates, and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps. It also would require the report to include: the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions, how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff, and efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups in the comptroller general report.
      • Direct the Education secretary, in awarding grants under the bill's teacher diversity programs, to award competitive priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.
      • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
      • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs (PL 109-270).
      • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs. In the amendment, leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs (PL 109-270).
      • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
      • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).
      • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree, as defined by a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270); and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.

      Substitute amendment that would:

    • Increase the maximum Pell Grant award by $625, rather than by $500.
    • Provide graduate and professional students attending public and nonprofit institutions with access to subsidized loans at the same interest rates available to these students for unsubsidized loans.
    • Replace the six-year statute of limitation on defaulted loans with a cap on collection fees charged to defaulted borrowers. It would set the caps as tiered percentages of the outstanding principal and interest on a loan reflecting first, second, third and fourth or subsequent collection efforts.
    • Change the definition of part-time faculty to make faculty members or instructors who teach a minimum of two courses and are not employed full-time anywhere else eligible for public service loan forgiveness.
    • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal financial assistance from using such assistance to carry out any action that discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth, a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth or sex stereotype.
    • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal funds from taking adverse action against students who join single-gender organizations.
    • Require the Education secretary to discharge a parent's liability on a loan by repaying the amount owed on the loan if the student becomes permanently and totally disabled or is unable to participate in substantially gainful activity.
    • Require institutions applying for aid for work-learning-service programs for the first time to submit their applications five months before the application due date for returning applicants. It also would clarify that a work college must be accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the Education secretary and have operated both a work-study program and a comprehensive work-learning service program for two years.
    • Require the Education secretary to prevent any person or entity assisting a student in managing loan repayment or applying for a repayment plan from accessing the National Student Loan Data System unless that person or entity meets certain requirements, including complying with codes of conduct and using an approved device.
    • Require for-profit institutions of higher education, when calculating their non-government revenue for the purposes of meeting existing government funding versus non-government revenue ratio requirements, to consider funds generated from activities that provide industry-related skills training under contract with an independent third party, as long as certain requirements are met. It would require that the institution does not offer more than 50 percent of courses through distance education and that the institution must ensure that less than 50 percent of enrolled students are enrolled exclusively in distance courses. It also would specify that the institution must have been providing such skills training before the bill's enactment.
    • Criminalize the unauthorized access of Education Department information technology systems to obtain commercial advantage or private financial gain, with up to a five-year prison sentence or up to a $20,000 fine, or both.
    • Reauthorize funds for graduate assistance in areas of national need at $35 million annually through fiscal 2021.
    • Require the Education secretary to encourage institutions of higher education to develop and implement plans for addressing campus mental health and student suicide.
    • Reauthorize such sums as may be necessary through fiscal 2021 for the Path to Success program, which helps at-risk adults transition into productive learning environments.
    • Direct the Education secretary to study the options for disaggregating the data reported under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) by sexual orientation and gender identity.
    • Direct the Education secretary to establish an advisory commission on serving and supporting students with mental health disabilities at higher education institutions.
    • As amended, the substitute amendment would:

    • Require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to eligible students about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp program, and how to obtain additional information on the availability of nutritional assistance.
    • Allow funds under the bill's federal state partnership grant program to be used for collaboration with industry or sector partnerships.
    • Establish a Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt.
    • Clarify that funds under the section of the bill reauthorizing the CCAMPIS program that provides support to establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students, should support evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.
    • Require net price calculators to, within one year of the bill's enactment, meet current requirements to include disclaimers stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations. The amendment also would outline new requirements for net price calculators, including: labeling, placement on the colleges website, what should be specified in the results screen, breakdown of various costs, and possible sources of aid. The amendment also would include provisions protecting the privacy of calculator users. It would, additionally, allow the secretary to develop a universal net price calculator housed within the Education department, subject to various requirements.
    • Direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.
    • Require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institution of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.
    • Direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the congressional authorizing committees examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates, and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps. It also would require the report to include: the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions, how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff, and efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups in the comptroller general report.
    • Direct the Education secretary, in awarding grants under the bill's teacher diversity programs, to award competitive priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.
    • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
    • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs (PL 109-270).
    • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs. In the amendment, leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs (PL 109-270).
    • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
    • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).
    • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree, as defined by a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270); and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.
    • Adopted (as amended) by voice vote.

      Oct. 31, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Vote to Report

      Reauthorize and overhaul federal student aid programs and other programs that provide aid to institutions under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) from fiscal 2021 through fiscal 2026.

      The bill would expand the Pell Grant program to increase the maximum award by $500 and extend eligibility for such grants to 14 semesters, resulting in a total grant award of $6,695 for fiscal 2021 and an estimated maximum award of $8,305 by fiscal 2029. The bill also would allow incarcerated students to access Pell Grants and allow short-term programs partnering with local industries to participate in the program.

      The bill also would alter the allocation formula under the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program to base grant amounts on the level of unmet need at an institution (instead of how long they've participated in the program) and allow program participants to provide emergency grant aid to students.

      The bill also would alter the formula by which federal work-study dollars are distributed to ensure that those allocations reflect the number of low-income students at an institution and the unmet needs of those students.

      It also would replace the numerous student loan repayment plans with one fixed repayment plan and one income-based repayment plan; under the income-based plan, borrowers earning up to 250 percent of the poverty line ($31,225 for single head of household for 2019) would repay at $0 per month until their earnings improve.

      It also would remove origination fees borrowers are required to pay when they borrow money from the government and allow them to take advantage of lower interest rates by refinancing their debt at the same rates as new borrowers.

      The bill also would expand the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program to allow several groups of individuals who may have been denied previously to participate, including individuals who work for Veteran Service Organizations and physicians working at nonprofit hospitals or other health care facilities in states that prohibit the direct hiring of these individuals.

      The bill also would automatically place borrowers who are more than 120 days delinquent in their loan repayments, into the income-based repayment plan in an attempt to prevent default. It also would reinstate the expired Perkins Loan Program as the Federal Direct Perkins Loan Program, which would create an additional source of borrowing for undergraduates and graduates by allocating additional funds directly to eligible institutions.

      The bill also would reduce the number of questions on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and require students who receive Pell Grants to only file the FAFSA once.

      It also would require the Department of Education to establish a Borrower Defense to Repayment process to discharge the federal loans of students who were defrauded by their colleges, and allow all federal student loans (not just direct loans) to be discharged.

      The bill also would create a new grant program to invest in states that agree to waive community college tuition and fees, and allow Pell grants to be used for non-tuition fees. It also would provide grant aid directly to low-income students who attend a minority serving institution (MSI) for up to 60 credits, allowing students who transfer from a community college to an MSI to earn a bachelors degree with minimal tuition cost.

      The bill also would make several changes to current programs to increase accountability, including the following:

      • Revise the 90/10 rule for proprietary schools that caps the amount of Department of Education financial aid these schools can receive to 90 percent of revenues, by reducing this amount to 85 percent and include all federal financial aid, including GI benefits.
      • Set a compliance standard for career training programs that are required to lead to gainful employment.
      • Require higher education institutions to disclose foreign gifts.
      • Improve transparency of the process by which for-profit schools convert into nonprofit institutions.
      • Require the college accreditation process to focus on two outcomes: completion and workforce participation.
      • Reassign some oversight duties from accrediting agencies to state governments.
      • Add new requirements for loan eligibility for certain certificate programs lasting between 300 and 600 hours.
      • Direct the Education secretary to update the criteria used to determine an institutions financial health.
      • Prevent the wholesale outsourcing of educational programs to third parties.

      The bill also would require the secretary within 180 days of the bill's enactment to establish within the Performance Based Organization (PBO) at the department that would review and investigate possible violations of the Higher Education Act and make recommendations on enforcement actions.

      The bill also would provide direct aid to historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions and strengthen HBCUs by expanding the possible uses for grants to HBCUs and improving the availability of funds under the HBCU Capital Financing program. It would permanently reauthorize the mandatory aid funds provided to HBCUs (which expired in fiscal 2019) and increase the total amount from $255 million per year to $300 million per year.

      It also would reauthorize two grant programs for Hispanic-Serving institutions that would allow for the establishment of an endowment fund to provide scholarships, and to promote post-baccalaureate opportunities for Hispanic Americans. It also would authorize appropriations of $350 million annually to for these programs.

      It also would authorize the secretary to award grants to participating four-year Tribal Colleges or Universities. The bill also would require that in order to be eligible for funding an institution has a student body of which not less than 35 percent are low-income students and commit to implementing reforms to improve the completion rates and other student outcomes.

      The bill also includes several provisions designed to address campus safety. It would require colleges to develop policies on hazing and harassment, and specify that hazing and harassment are reportable offenses under the Clery Act, a consumer protection law that requires colleges to report and make available information on campus-based crimes.

      It also would direct the Education secretary to develop a standardized online survey tool regarding student experiences with domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment and stalking, and require institutions to administer the survey every two years.

      It also would prohibit the Education secretary from issuing or enforcing the Title IX regulations on sexual harassment proposed in Nov. 2018, that provide increased protections for students accused of sex harassment and limits liability for colleges .

      The bill also would strengthen civil rights enforcement by requiring institutions to designate an employee to coordinate compliance with the Civil Rights Act and notify students and employees of Civil Rights Act enforcement policies.

      The bill also would authorize appropriations as follows:

      • $500 million annually for fiscal 2019 and such sums as may be necessary for each of the five succeeding fiscal years for teacher and school leader quality partnership grants.
      • $1.12 billion for the currently existing TRIO program (federal outreach and student services programs geared towards individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds) for fiscal year 2021, and such sums as necessary for each of the five succeeding fiscal years (with amounts determined by the annual adjustment rate, as outlined in the Consumer Price Index).
      • For federal work-study programs: $1.5 billion for fiscal year 2021, $1.75 billion for fiscal year 2022, $2 billion for fiscal year 2023, $2.25 billion for fiscal year 2024, amd $2.5 billion for fiscal year 2025.
      • $250 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for Jumpstart to College grant programs.
      • $1 billion for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for the Community College Student Success program (a new program under the bill providing grants to cover the cost of community college for eligible students).
      • $500 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for the Federal Pell Grant Bonus Program (a program under the bill seeking to support low-income students through financial aid and support services).
      • $162.5 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants to improve remedial education in higher education.
      • $125 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years (with amounts increased according to the annual adjustment rate) for grants to institutions that advance science and technology learning and foreign language proficiency.
      • $850 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants that assist minority-serving institutions in developing innovations that provide solutions to persistent challenges in enabling economically and educationally disadvantaged students to enroll in and graduate from college.
      • $150 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants to states to improve access to higher education for foster and homeless youth.
      • $181 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for postsecondary Perkins career and technical education programs under the bill.

      As amended, the bill would:

      • Increase the maximum Pell Grant award to $625.
      • Provide graduate and professional students attending public and nonprofit institutions with access to subsidized loans at the same interest rates available to these students for unsubsidized loans.
      • Replace the six-year statute of limitation on defaulted loans with a cap on collection fees charged to defaulted borrowers. The caps would be tiered percentages of the outstanding principal and interest on a loan reflecting first, second, third, and fourth or subsequent collection efforts.
      • Change the definition of part-time faculty to make faculty members or instructors who teach a minimum of two courses and are not employed full-time anywhere else eligible for public service loan forgiveness.
      • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal financial assistance from using the federal assistance to carry out any action that discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth, a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth or sex stereotype.
      • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal funds from taking adverse action against students who join single-gender organizations.
      • Require the Education secretary to discharge a parent's liability on a loan by repaying the amount owed on the loan if the student becomes permanently and totally disabled or is unable to participate in substantially gainful activity.
      • Require institutions applying for aid for work-learning-service programs for the first time to submit their applications months before the application due date for returning applicants, as well as clarifying that a work college must be accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the Education secretary and have operated both a work-study program and a comprehensive work-learning service program for two years.
      • Require the Education secretary to prevent any person or entity assisting a student in managing loan repayment or applying for a repayment plan from accessing the National Student Loan Data System unless that person or entity meets certain requirements, including complying with codes of conduct and using an approved device.
      • Require for-profit institutions of higher education, when calculating how much of their revenue must come from non-government sources, consider funds generated from activities that provide industry-related skills training under contract with an independent third party, as long as certain requirements are met.
      • Criminalize the use of a device to access Education Department information technology systems to obtain commercial advantage or private financial gain, with up to a five-year prison sentence or up to a $20,000 fine, or both.
      • Reauthorize funds for graduate assistance in areas of national need at $35 million annually through fiscal 2021.
      • Require the Education secretary to encourage institutions of higher education to develop and implement plans for addressing campus mental health and student suicide.
      • Authorize such sums as may be necessary through fiscal 2021 for the Path to Success program, which helps at-risk adults transition into productive learning environments.
      • Direct the Education secretary to study the options for disaggregating the data reported under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) by sexual orientation and gender identity.
      • Direct the Education secretary to establish an advisory commission on serving and supporting students with mental health disabilities at higher education institutions.
      • Require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to eligible students about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and how to obtain more information.
      • Allow the use of funds under the bill's federal state partnership grant program for collaboration with industry or sector partnerships.
      • Establish a Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt.
      • Clarify that funds used to establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students should support evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.
      • Require net price calculators to, within one year of the bill's enactment, to meet current requirements, including disclaimers stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations. It also would outline new requirements for net price calculators, including: labeling, placement on the colleges website, what should be specified in the results screen, breakdown of various costs, and possible sources of aid. It also would include provisions protecting the privacy of calculator users. It also would allow the Education secretary to develop a universal net price calculator housed within the Education department, subject to various requirements.
      • Direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, to disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.
      • Require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institutions of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.
      • Direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the authorizing committees examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates, and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps. It also would require the report to include: the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions, how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff, and efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.
      • Direct the Education secretary, when awarding grants under the bill's teacher diversity programs, to give priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.
      • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
      • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).
      • Allow the use of Education Department institutional support grants to establish community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improve career and technical training programs; align and integrate career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.
      • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
      • Require institutions receiving aid under the bill to include in their annual security report a statement of current campus policy regarding required background checks for employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.
      • Require institutions of higher education whose non-instructional spending increases by more than 5 percent (using year-to-year data) disclose the increase to students and prospective students, with an analysis of how the increases are expected to impact tuition.
      • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs. In the amendment, leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).

      Reauthorize and overhaul federal student aid programs and other programs that provide aid to institutions under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) from fiscal 2021 through fiscal 2026.

      The bill would expand the Pell Grant program to increase the maximum award by $500 and extend eligibility for such grants to 14 semesters, resulting in a total grant award of $6,695 for fiscal 2021 and an estimated maximum award of $8,305 by fiscal 2029. The bill also would allow incarcerated students to access Pell Grants and allow short-term programs partnering with local industries to participate in the program.

      The bill also would alter the allocation formula under the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program to base grant amounts on the level of unmet need at an institution (instead of how long they've participated in the program) and allow program participants to provide emergency grant aid to students.

      The bill also would alter the formula by which federal work-study dollars are distributed to ensure that those allocations reflect the number of low-income students at an institution and the unmet needs of those students.

      It also would replace the numerous student loan repayment plans with one fixed repayment plan and one income-based repayment plan; under the income-based plan, borrowers earning up to 250 percent of the poverty line ($31,225 for single head of household for 2019) would repay at $0 per month until their earnings improve.

      It also would remove origination fees borrowers are required to pay when they borrow money from the government and allow them to take advantage of lower interest rates by refinancing their debt at the same rates as new borrowers.

      The bill also would expand the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program to allow several groups of individuals who may have been denied previously to participate, including individuals who work for Veteran Service Organizations and physicians working at nonprofit hospitals or other health care facilities in states that prohibit the direct hiring of these individuals.

      The bill also would automatically place borrowers who are more than 120 days delinquent in their loan repayments, into the income-based repayment plan in an attempt to prevent default. It also would reinstate the expired Perkins Loan Program as the Federal Direct Perkins Loan Program, which would create an additional source of borrowing for undergraduates and graduates by allocating additional funds directly to eligible institutions.

      The bill also would reduce the number of questions on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and require students who receive Pell Grants to only file the FAFSA once.

      It also would require the Department of Education to establish a Borrower Defense to Repayment process to discharge the federal loans of students who were defrauded by their colleges, and allow all federal student loans (not just direct loans) to be discharged.

      The bill also would create a new grant program to invest in states that agree to waive community college tuition and fees, and allow Pell grants to be used for non-tuition fees. It also would provide grant aid directly to low-income students who attend a minority serving institution (MSI) for up to 60 credits, allowing students who transfer from a community college to an MSI to earn a bachelors degree with minimal tuition cost.

      The bill also would make several changes to current programs to increase accountability, including the following:

    • Revise the 90/10 rule for proprietary schools that caps the amount of Department of Education financial aid these schools can receive to 90 percent of revenues, by reducing this amount to 85 percent and include all federal financial aid, including GI benefits.
    • Set a compliance standard for career training programs that are required to lead to gainful employment.
    • Require higher education institutions to disclose foreign gifts.
    • Improve transparency of the process by which for-profit schools convert into nonprofit institutions.
    • Require the college accreditation process to focus on two outcomes: completion and workforce participation.
    • Reassign some oversight duties from accrediting agencies to state governments.
    • Add new requirements for loan eligibility for certain certificate programs lasting between 300 and 600 hours.
    • Direct the Education secretary to update the criteria used to determine an institutions financial health.
    • Prevent the wholesale outsourcing of educational programs to third parties.
    • The bill also would require the secretary within 180 days of the bill's enactment to establish within the Performance Based Organization (PBO) at the department that would review and investigate possible violations of the Higher Education Act and make recommendations on enforcement actions.

      The bill also would provide direct aid to historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions and strengthen HBCUs by expanding the possible uses for grants to HBCUs and improving the availability of funds under the HBCU Capital Financing program. It would permanently reauthorize the mandatory aid funds provided to HBCUs (which expired in fiscal 2019) and increase the total amount from $255 million per year to $300 million per year.

      It also would reauthorize two grant programs for Hispanic-Serving institutions that would allow for the establishment of an endowment fund to provide scholarships, and to promote post-baccalaureate opportunities for Hispanic Americans. It also would authorize appropriations of $350 million annually to for these programs.

      It also would authorize the secretary to award grants to participating four-year Tribal Colleges or Universities. The bill also would require that in order to be eligible for funding an institution has a student body of which not less than 35 percent are low-income students and commit to implementing reforms to improve the completion rates and other student outcomes.

      The bill also includes several provisions designed to address campus safety. It would require colleges to develop policies on hazing and harassment, and specify that hazing and harassment are reportable offenses under the Clery Act, a consumer protection law that requires colleges to report and make available information on campus-based crimes.

      It also would direct the Education secretary to develop a standardized online survey tool regarding student experiences with domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment and stalking, and require institutions to administer the survey every two years.

      It also would prohibit the Education secretary from issuing or enforcing the Title IX regulations on sexual harassment proposed in Nov. 2018, that provide increased protections for students accused of sex harassment and limits liability for colleges .

      The bill also would strengthen civil rights enforcement by requiring institutions to designate an employee to coordinate compliance with the Civil Rights Act and notify students and employees of Civil Rights Act enforcement policies.

      The bill also would authorize appropriations as follows:

    • $500 million annually for fiscal 2019 and such sums as may be necessary for each of the five succeeding fiscal years for teacher and school leader quality partnership grants.
    • $1.12 billion for the currently existing TRIO program (federal outreach and student services programs geared towards individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds) for fiscal year 2021, and such sums as necessary for each of the five succeeding fiscal years (with amounts determined by the annual adjustment rate, as outlined in the Consumer Price Index).
    • For federal work-study programs: $1.5 billion for fiscal year 2021, $1.75 billion for fiscal year 2022, $2 billion for fiscal year 2023, $2.25 billion for fiscal year 2024, amd $2.5 billion for fiscal year 2025.
    • $250 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for Jumpstart to College grant programs.
    • $1 billion for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for the Community College Student Success program (a new program under the bill providing grants to cover the cost of community college for eligible students).
    • $500 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for the Federal Pell Grant Bonus Program (a program under the bill seeking to support low-income students through financial aid and support services).
    • $162.5 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants to improve remedial education in higher education.
    • $125 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years (with amounts increased according to the annual adjustment rate) for grants to institutions that advance science and technology learning and foreign language proficiency.
    • $850 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants that assist minority-serving institutions in developing innovations that provide solutions to persistent challenges in enabling economically and educationally disadvantaged students to enroll in and graduate from college.
    • $150 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for grants to states to improve access to higher education for foster and homeless youth.
    • $181 million for fiscal year 2021 and each of the five succeeding fiscal years for postsecondary Perkins career and technical education programs under the bill.
    • As amended, the bill would:

    • Increase the maximum Pell Grant award to $625.
    • Provide graduate and professional students attending public and nonprofit institutions with access to subsidized loans at the same interest rates available to these students for unsubsidized loans.
    • Replace the six-year statute of limitation on defaulted loans with a cap on collection fees charged to defaulted borrowers. The caps would be tiered percentages of the outstanding principal and interest on a loan reflecting first, second, third, and fourth or subsequent collection efforts.
    • Change the definition of part-time faculty to make faculty members or instructors who teach a minimum of two courses and are not employed full-time anywhere else eligible for public service loan forgiveness.
    • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal financial assistance from using the federal assistance to carry out any action that discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, childbirth, a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth or sex stereotype.
    • Prohibit institutions of higher education receiving federal funds from taking adverse action against students who join single-gender organizations.
    • Require the Education secretary to discharge a parent's liability on a loan by repaying the amount owed on the loan if the student becomes permanently and totally disabled or is unable to participate in substantially gainful activity.
    • Require institutions applying for aid for work-learning-service programs for the first time to submit their applications months before the application due date for returning applicants, as well as clarifying that a work college must be accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the Education secretary and have operated both a work-study program and a comprehensive work-learning service program for two years.
    • Require the Education secretary to prevent any person or entity assisting a student in managing loan repayment or applying for a repayment plan from accessing the National Student Loan Data System unless that person or entity meets certain requirements, including complying with codes of conduct and using an approved device.
    • Require for-profit institutions of higher education, when calculating how much of their revenue must come from non-government sources, consider funds generated from activities that provide industry-related skills training under contract with an independent third party, as long as certain requirements are met.
    • Criminalize the use of a device to access Education Department information technology systems to obtain commercial advantage or private financial gain, with up to a five-year prison sentence or up to a $20,000 fine, or both.
    • Reauthorize funds for graduate assistance in areas of national need at $35 million annually through fiscal 2021.
    • Require the Education secretary to encourage institutions of higher education to develop and implement plans for addressing campus mental health and student suicide.
    • Authorize such sums as may be necessary through fiscal 2021 for the Path to Success program, which helps at-risk adults transition into productive learning environments.
    • Direct the Education secretary to study the options for disaggregating the data reported under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (PL 89-329) by sexual orientation and gender identity.
    • Direct the Education secretary to establish an advisory commission on serving and supporting students with mental health disabilities at higher education institutions.
    • Require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to eligible students about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and how to obtain more information.
    • Allow the use of funds under the bill's federal state partnership grant program for collaboration with industry or sector partnerships.
    • Establish a Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt.
    • Clarify that funds used to establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students should support evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.
    • Require net price calculators to, within one year of the bill's enactment, to meet current requirements, including disclaimers stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations. It also would outline new requirements for net price calculators, including: labeling, placement on the colleges website, what should be specified in the results screen, breakdown of various costs, and possible sources of aid. It also would include provisions protecting the privacy of calculator users. It also would allow the Education secretary to develop a universal net price calculator housed within the Education department, subject to various requirements.
    • Direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, to disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.
    • Require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institutions of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.
    • Direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the authorizing committees examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates, and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps. It also would require the report to include: the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions, how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff, and efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.
    • Direct the Education secretary, when awarding grants under the bill's teacher diversity programs, to give priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.
    • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
    • Include building capacity for career and technical education as a possible practice adopted by community colleges to improve student outcomes that should be outlined in grant applications for the federal-state partnership program under the bill. Career and technical education would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).
    • Allow the use of Education Department institutional support grants to establish community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improve career and technical training programs; align and integrate career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.
    • Direct the comptroller general to conduct a study on state practices involving the denial, suspension or revocation of drivers licenses as a penalty for student loan default.
    • Require institutions receiving aid under the bill to include in their annual security report a statement of current campus policy regarding required background checks for employees and volunteers working with student athletes, children, or youth participating in university-sponsored programs held in campus facilities.
    • Require institutions of higher education whose non-instructional spending increases by more than 5 percent (using year-to-year data) disclose the increase to students and prospective students, with an analysis of how the increases are expected to impact tuition.
    • Add new authorized activities for grants from the Education Department that provide institutional support: establishing community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs. In the amendment, leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).
    • Ordered reported favorably to the full House (as amended) 28-22. Note: <p>The committee voted 28-22 to report the bill.</p>

  • Oct. 30, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Education and Labor Committee.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Career and Technical Education Definition
      Stevens, D-Mich. —

    Amendment to the Thompson, R-Pa., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would clarify that the definition of career and technical education in the Thompson amendment refers to the definition in the 2006 vocational and technical education reauthorization law (PL 109-270). The 2006 law defined career and technical education as organized educational activities that provide coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and provide technical skill proficiency, an industry-recognized credential, a certificate, or an associate degree.

    Amendment to the Thompson, R-Pa., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would clarify that the definition of career and technical education in the Thompson amendment refers to the definition in the 2006 vocational and technical education reauthorization law (PL 109-270). The 2006 law defined career and technical education as organized educational activities that provide coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and provide technical skill proficiency, an industry-recognized credential, a certificate, or an associate degree.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Consent for Data Collection
      Johnson, R-S.D. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions of higher education to obtain the written consent of students not receiving financial assistance under the bill before collecting and submitting their data to the Education department, as required in the bill.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions of higher education to obtain the written consent of students not receiving financial assistance under the bill before collecting and submitting their data to the Education department, as required in the bill.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Student Athlete Rights
      Walker, R-N.C. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to comply with state laws in which the institution is located, on the name, image, and likeness rights for student athletes, in order to participate in aid programs under the bill.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to comply with state laws in which the institution is located, on the name, image, and likeness rights for student athletes, in order to participate in aid programs under the bill.

    Withdrawn.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Administrative Expenses
      Murphy, R-N.C. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove a provision in current law that requires the Education secretary to reserve such sums as necessary from funds appropriated, to pay each institution an amount equal to $5 for each student who receives financial assistance, to be used to offset administrative costs associated with the financial aid program.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would remove a provision in current law that requires the Education secretary to reserve such sums as necessary from funds appropriated, to pay each institution an amount equal to $5 for each student who receives financial assistance, to be used to offset administrative costs associated with the financial aid program.

    Rejected by voice vote.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Grants for Institutional Support
      Byrne, R-Ala. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would add new authorized activities eligible for grant funding under the current program that provides grants to eligible institutions to improve academic quality, institutional management and fiscal stability.

    The amendment would allow funding for tutoring and counseling to improve academic success, including innovative and customized instructional courses, which may include remedial education and English language instructions.

    It also would allow funding for the acquisition of technology services, and equipment for use in strengthening funds and administrative management.

    It also would allow funding to establish community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.

    As amended, it also would clarify that the definition of leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would add new authorized activities eligible for grant funding under the current program that provides grants to eligible institutions to improve academic quality, institutional management and fiscal stability.

    The amendment would allow funding for tutoring and counseling to improve academic success, including innovative and customized instructional courses, which may include remedial education and English language instructions.

    It also would allow funding for the acquisition of technology services, and equipment for use in strengthening funds and administrative management.

    It also would allow funding to establish community outreach programs that encourage elementary and secondary school students to pursue postsecondary education; improvement of career and technical training programs; alignment and integration of career and technical education programs with programs that lead to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree; and developing access to dual or concurrent enrollment programs.

    As amended, it also would clarify that the definition of leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree would be based on the definition in a 2006 law funding career and technical training (PL 109-270).

    Adopted (as amended) by voice vote.

    Oct. 30, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Definition Clarification
      Levin, D-Mich. —

    Amendment to the Byrne, R-Ala., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would clarify that the definition of leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree is based on the definition in the 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs.(PL 109-270).

    Amendment to the Byrne, R-Ala., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would clarify that the definition of leading to a bachelors degree, graduate degree, or professional degree is based on the definition in the 2006 law reauthorizing career and technical training programs.(PL 109-270).

    Adopted by voice vote.
  • Oct. 29, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the House Education and Labor Committee.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
      Bonamici, D-Ore. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to students receiving work-study assistance about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and how to obtain more information about the program.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions receiving grants under the bill to send notifications to students receiving work-study assistance about their potential eligibility for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and how to obtain more information about the program.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Campus Childcare Programs
      Norcross, D-N.J. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require that grants awarded to institutions of higher education to assist them in providing campus-based child care services to low-income students be used to support or establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students. It also would allow the use of such grants to provide evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require that grants awarded to institutions of higher education to assist them in providing campus-based child care services to low-income students be used to support or establish campus-based childcare programs serving low-income students. It also would allow the use of such grants to provide evening, summer, weekend and before and after school services as well as services to expectant parents.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Minority Faculty and Student Inclusion
      F. Wilson, D-Fla. —

    Amendment to the Jayapal, D-Wash., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require the comptroller general's report on racial and socioeconomic equity gaps at public four-year institutions to examine the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions and how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff. It also would require the report to examine states' efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.

    Amendment to the Jayapal, D-Wash., amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require the comptroller general's report on racial and socioeconomic equity gaps at public four-year institutions to examine the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions and how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff. It also would require the report to examine states' efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Racial Data Report
      Jayapal, D-Wash. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and the House Education and Labor Committee examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps.

    As amended, it also would require the report to examine the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions and how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff and states' efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the comptroller general to submit a report to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and the House Education and Labor Committee examining racial and socioeconomic equity gaps among racial and income groups in enrollment, degree attainment, student loan repayment rates and other outcomes at public four-year degree granting institutions, disaggregated by state. It also would require the report to include the extent to which outcomes have changed, the factors that may contribute to differences and efforts by states to close gaps.

    As amended, it also would require the report to examine the racial breakdown of faculty and staff at public four-year institutions and how retention rates for minority faculty and staff compare to rates for non-minority faculty and staff and states' efforts to improve inclusion for students belonging to underrepresented racial and income groups.

    Adopted (as amended) by voice vote.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Teacher Cultural Competency
      DeSaulnier, D-Calif. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the Education secretary, when awarding federal Pell Grants, as well as grants for early outreach and student services, federal supplemental education opportunity grants, and grants for child care access for students to give priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the Education secretary, when awarding federal Pell Grants, as well as grants for early outreach and student services, federal supplemental education opportunity grants, and grants for child care access for students to give priority to institutions whose grant applications include a plan to recruit candidates with cultural and community competency related to the demographics of the student body in which the candidate would be placed.

    Adopted by voice vote.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Means Testing for Income
      Smucker, R-Pa. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would specify under the bill's federal-state partnership grant program the term "eligible student" also includes independent students with an adjusted gross income of less than $80,000 and dependent students whose parents have an adjusted gross income of less than $160,000.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would specify under the bill's federal-state partnership grant program the term "eligible student" also includes independent students with an adjusted gross income of less than $80,000 and dependent students whose parents have an adjusted gross income of less than $160,000.

    Rejected 18-28.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Industry and Sector Partnerships
      McBath, D-Ga. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow states or Indian tribes to use remaining federal state partnership grant program funds to collaborate with one or more industry or sector partnerships to expand the scope and capacity of high-quality academic and occupational skills training programs at community colleges.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would allow states or Indian tribes to use remaining federal state partnership grant program funds to collaborate with one or more industry or sector partnerships to expand the scope and capacity of high-quality academic and occupational skills training programs at community colleges.

    Adopted 46-0.

    Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Financial Aid Offers
      Smucker, R-Pa. —

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require the secretary of Education, within 18 months of the bill's enactment, to publish requirements for financial aid offers based on consumer testing. It would specify that the rules must require financial aid offers to:

    • Serve as the "primary source" for federal, state, and institutional financial aid information provided by an institution to prospective students and enrolled students.
    • Specify the "simple, plain-language, and consumer-friendly information" be included in any financial aid offer extended to students. It would require the language to include information regarding the differences between each type of financial aid, and the understanding that grants and scholarships do not have to be repaid. In addition, the cost of attendance, deadlines for accepting financial aid, and information on average student debt and graduation rates must be included in the offer.

    The amendment also would require a financial aid offer to include a standardized quick reference box that would quickly convey information to the prospective student regarding the cost of attendance, total grants and scholarships offered, and net price.

    Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require the secretary of Education, within 18 months of the bill's enactment, to publish requirements for financial aid offers based on consumer testing. It would specify that the rules must require financial aid offers to:

    • Serve as the "primary source" for federal, state, and institutional financial aid information provided by an institution to prospective students and enrolled students.
    • Specify the "simple, plain-language, and consumer-friendly information" be included in any financial aid offer extended to students. It would require the language to include information regarding the differences between each type of financial aid, and the understanding that grants and scholarships do not have to be repaid. In addition, the cost of attendance, deadlines for accepting financial aid, and information on average student debt and graduation rates must be included in the offer.
    • The amendment also would require a financial aid offer to include a standardized quick reference box that would quickly convey information to the prospective student regarding the cost of attendance, total grants and scholarships offered, and net price.

      Rejected 18-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Student Debt Cancellation Commission
        Omar, D-Minn. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would establish a 13-member Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt. It would require the commission to submit a report to Congress with recommendations to create a federal student loan cancellation program. It also would terminate the commission 90 days after it submits its report to Congress.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would establish a 13-member Commission on Federal Student Loan Cancellation to study the impact of federal student loan debt on the socioeconomic outcomes of individual borrowers and regional and national economies as well as the feasibility of canceling federal student loan debt. It would require the commission to submit a report to Congress with recommendations to create a federal student loan cancellation program. It also would terminate the commission 90 days after it submits its report to Congress.

      Adopted 28-18.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Loan Cancellation
        Smucker, R-Pa. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the secretary of Education from canceling any amount of the balance due on a Federal Direct Loan if the borrower of the loan is a registered lobbyist.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit the secretary of Education from canceling any amount of the balance due on a Federal Direct Loan if the borrower of the loan is a registered lobbyist.

      Rejected 18-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Technical Change
        Smucker, R-Pa. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would make a technical change.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would make a technical change.

      Rejected 18-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Net Price Calculators
        Trahan, D-Mass. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require, within one year of the bill's enactment, net price calculators for an institution of higher education to meet certain requirements, including displaying a disclaimer stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations.

      It would require that the link for such calculators are clearly labeled as a "net price calculator" and posted on the institutions' website where information on costs and aid is provided.

      It would require that the calculator's input screen display a chart of the net prices for students receiving federal student financial aid disaggregated by income categories.

      It also would specify that the results screen must include the year for which the net price applies and the year of the data used to determine that net price. It also would require the results screen to include a breakdown of costs of attendance and possible sources of aid.

      The amendment would also include provisions intended to protect the privacy of calculator users, including language to prohibit any personally identifiable information provided by users from being sold or made available to third parties.

      It also would allow the Education secretary to develop a universal net price calculator that enables users to answer one set of questions and receive net prices for any institution that is required to have a net price calculator. It would require the calculator to be tested with consumers for up to six months and that the results of such testing be used in the final development of the calculator.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require, within one year of the bill's enactment, net price calculators for an institution of higher education to meet certain requirements, including displaying a disclaimer stating that price estimates do not represent final financial determinations.

      It would require that the link for such calculators are clearly labeled as a "net price calculator" and posted on the institutions' website where information on costs and aid is provided.

      It would require that the calculator's input screen display a chart of the net prices for students receiving federal student financial aid disaggregated by income categories.

      It also would specify that the results screen must include the year for which the net price applies and the year of the data used to determine that net price. It also would require the results screen to include a breakdown of costs of attendance and possible sources of aid.

      The amendment would also include provisions intended to protect the privacy of calculator users, including language to prohibit any personally identifiable information provided by users from being sold or made available to third parties.

      It also would allow the Education secretary to develop a universal net price calculator that enables users to answer one set of questions and receive net prices for any institution that is required to have a net price calculator. It would require the calculator to be tested with consumers for up to six months and that the results of such testing be used in the final development of the calculator.

      Adopted 45-0.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Resources for Bias Prevention
        R. Scott, D-Va. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, to disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the Education secretary, within one year of the bill's enactment and annually thereafter, to disseminate to institutions of higher education information on best practices for preventing and responding to incidents of bias.

      Adopted by voice vote.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — En Bloc Amendments
      Guthrie, R-Ky. —

      Amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would:

      • Authorize the Education secretary to award grants for "earn-and-learn" programs created from partnerships between businesses and institutions of higher education to allow students to work for a private entity while attending a higher education institution.
      • Alter the federal work study program match requirements by decreasing the match percentage by 5 percent in each successive fiscal year after the bill's enactment. It also would allow institutions in the federal work study program to use a portion of the funds to identify opportunities for students to engage in apprenticeships.

      Amendments to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would:

    • Authorize the Education secretary to award grants for "earn-and-learn" programs created from partnerships between businesses and institutions of higher education to allow students to work for a private entity while attending a higher education institution.
    • Alter the federal work study program match requirements by decreasing the match percentage by 5 percent in each successive fiscal year after the bill's enactment. It also would allow institutions in the federal work study program to use a portion of the funds to identify opportunities for students to engage in apprenticeships.
    • Rejected 18-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Competency-Based Education
        Grothman, R-Wis. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would amend a law (PL 89-329) that aims to strengthen the educational resources of United States colleges and universities. It would define a competency-based education program as a postsecondary program offered by an institution of higher education that:

      • Provides competency-based education, which upon a students demonstration of competencies identified by the institution, leads to the award of a certificate, degree, or other educational credential.
      • Ensures title IV funds, which refers to financial aid funds for students of higher education in the U.S., may be used only for learning that results from instruction provided by the institution, not that of learning that was learned prior to enrollment in the program.
      • Is organized in a way that an institution can determine what constitutes a full-time, three-quarter time, half-time, and less than half-time workload for the purposes of awarding assistance under title IV.

      It would define the term "academic year" as the published measured period established by an institution of higher education that is necessary for a student with a normal full-time workload for the course of study that the student is pursuing.

      It would specify that to be considered as a competency-based programs it must have been evaluated and approved by an accrediting agency or association that is recognized by the Education secretary and met the requirements of a direct assessment program.

      It would require that the student is enrolled in coursework attributable only to two academic years within the award year to be eligible to receive any loan under a competency-based program.

      It would add criteria for recognition of accrediting agencies or associations to include that the accrediting entity demonstrates the ability to review, evaluate, and assess the quality of any instruction delivery model that the entity has included within its scope of recognition. It also would specify that the accrediting entity must require the institution being accredited to have processes that establish that the student who registers in a course or program is the same student who participates in testing or other assessment and that such process does not infringe upon student privacy.

      It also would strike sections regarding competency-based education and to create a council to study the ongoing innovation and development of competency-based education programs.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would amend a law (PL 89-329) that aims to strengthen the educational resources of United States colleges and universities. It would define a competency-based education program as a postsecondary program offered by an institution of higher education that:

    • Provides competency-based education, which upon a students demonstration of competencies identified by the institution, leads to the award of a certificate, degree, or other educational credential.
    • Ensures title IV funds, which refers to financial aid funds for students of higher education in the U.S., may be used only for learning that results from instruction provided by the institution, not that of learning that was learned prior to enrollment in the program.
    • Is organized in a way that an institution can determine what constitutes a full-time, three-quarter time, half-time, and less than half-time workload for the purposes of awarding assistance under title IV.
    • It would define the term "academic year" as the published measured period established by an institution of higher education that is necessary for a student with a normal full-time workload for the course of study that the student is pursuing.

      It would specify that to be considered as a competency-based programs it must have been evaluated and approved by an accrediting agency or association that is recognized by the Education secretary and met the requirements of a direct assessment program.

      It would require that the student is enrolled in coursework attributable only to two academic years within the award year to be eligible to receive any loan under a competency-based program.

      It would add criteria for recognition of accrediting agencies or associations to include that the accrediting entity demonstrates the ability to review, evaluate, and assess the quality of any instruction delivery model that the entity has included within its scope of recognition. It also would specify that the accrediting entity must require the institution being accredited to have processes that establish that the student who registers in a course or program is the same student who participates in testing or other assessment and that such process does not infringe upon student privacy.

      It also would strike sections regarding competency-based education and to create a council to study the ongoing innovation and development of competency-based education programs.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — For-Profit Revenue Ratio
        Shalala, D-Fla. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institutions of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would require institutions to derive at least 15 percent of revenue from sources other than federal education assistance funds in order to qualify as a proprietary institutions of higher education for any award year beginning after July 1, 2022.

      Adopted 28-17.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Regulatory Requirements
        Roe, R-Tenn. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prevent the bill's provisions from taking effect until the Education secretary submits to Congress an assurance that the bill's regulatory requirements would not raise the cost of attendance for students at institutions of higher education.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prevent the bill's provisions from taking effect until the Education secretary submits to Congress an assurance that the bill's regulatory requirements would not raise the cost of attendance for students at institutions of higher education.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Free Speech Policies
        Roe, R-Tenn. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would express the sense of Congress that free speech zones and restrictive speech codes are at odds with the First Amendment and that no public institution receiving federal aid should restrict speech through these zones and codes. The amendment would prohibit institutions from receiving funds unless the institution certifies to the Education secretary that it has disclosed any speech policies to current and prospective students.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would express the sense of Congress that free speech zones and restrictive speech codes are at odds with the First Amendment and that no public institution receiving federal aid should restrict speech through these zones and codes. The amendment would prohibit institutions from receiving funds unless the institution certifies to the Education secretary that it has disclosed any speech policies to current and prospective students.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Work Study Program
        Roe, R-Tenn. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit funds under the federal work-study grant program from being used to pay the dues or fees of a labor organization on behalf of students employed through work-study programs. It also would bar institutions of higher education from treating students in work-study programs as employees for purposes of collective bargaining.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit funds under the federal work-study grant program from being used to pay the dues or fees of a labor organization on behalf of students employed through work-study programs. It also would bar institutions of higher education from treating students in work-study programs as employees for purposes of collective bargaining.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Religious Mission or Affiliation
        Walberg, R-Mich. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit government entities from taking an adverse action against an institution of higher education that receives federal aid if such action would prohibit or penalize the institution for acts or omissions that are related to its religious mission or the religious affiliation of the institution.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would prohibit government entities from taking an adverse action against an institution of higher education that receives federal aid if such action would prohibit or penalize the institution for acts or omissions that are related to its religious mission or the religious affiliation of the institution.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Collective Bargaining Impact
        Walberg, R-Mich. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the comptroller general, within one year of the bill's enactment, to study the impact of collective bargaining by students employed by a university in connection with their enrollment on tuition costs.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would direct the comptroller general, within one year of the bill's enactment, to study the impact of collective bargaining by students employed by a university in connection with their enrollment on tuition costs.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — "Dependents" Definition
        Grothman, R-Wis. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would specify that a student who enters a legal guardianship with an individual other than one of their parents would be considered a "dependent student" if the student continues to receive medical and financial support from a parent.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would specify that a student who enters a legal guardianship with an individual other than one of their parents would be considered a "dependent student" if the student continues to receive medical and financial support from a parent.

      Rejected 17-28.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Sexual Violence Provisions
        Foxx, R-N.C. —

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would strike language that would prohibit the Education secretary from issuing or enforcing amendments to the sex discrimination rules proposed in November 2018 or any substantially similar regulations.

      Amendment to the Davis, D-Calif., substitute amendment that would strike language that would prohibit the Education secretary from issuing or enforcing amendments to the sex discrimination rules proposed in November 2018 or any substantially similar regulations.

      Rejected by voice vote.

      Oct. 29, 2019 — Committee Vote: Federal Student Aid Overhaul — Earnings Requirement
        Foxx, R-N.C. —

      Amendment that would require programs of study to submit to the secretary of Education expected annual earnings for students six months after the completion of the program. It would specify that in order for institutions to be eligible for the federal Pell Grant program, such earnings must be greater than the average or median annual earnings paid to individuals with only a high school degree based on available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

      Amendment that would require programs of study to submit to the secretary of Education expected annual earnings for students six months after the completion of the program. It would specify that in order for institutions to be eligible for the federal Pell Grant program, such earnings must be greater than the average or median annual earnings paid to individuals with only a high school degree based on available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

      Withdrawn by voice vote.

  • Oct. 28, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 5

    Lowenthal, (D-Calif.)Stevens, (D-Mich.)Watson Coleman, (D-N.J.)
    Maloney, S.P. (D-N.Y.)Vela, (D-Texas)
  • Oct. 23, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 8

    Barragan, (D-Calif.)Frankel, (D-Fla.)Higgins, B. (D-N.Y.)
    Castor, (D-Fla.)Garcia, (D-Ill.)Panetta, (D-Calif.)
    Chu, (D-Calif.)Haaland, (D-N.M.)
  • Oct. 21, 2019Draft bill text released by Rep. R. Scott, D-Va., House Education and Labor Committee., Department of Education (Education Dept.).

  • Oct. 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 24

    Bass, (D-Calif.)Langevin, (D-R.I.)Payne (D-N.J.)
    Beatty, (D-Ohio)Lee, B. (D-Calif.)Quigley, (D-Ill.)
    Carson, (D-Ind.)Malinowski, (D-N.J.)San Nicolas, (D-Guam)
    Cicilline, (D-R.I.)McGovern, (D-Mass.)Scanlon, (D-Pa.)
    Davis, D. (D-Ill.)Meng, (D-N.Y.)Schiff, (D-Calif.)
    Espaillat, (D-N.Y.)Napolitano, (D-Calif.)Schrader, (D-Ore.)
    Garamendi, (D-Calif.)Neguse, (D-Colo.)Sewell, (D-Ala.)
    Khanna, (D-Calif.)Norton, (D-D.C.)Thompson, M. (D-Calif.)
  • Oct. 15, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 24

    Adams, (D-N.C.)Harder, (D-Calif.)Sablan, (I-N. Marianas)
    Bonamici, (D-Ore.)Hayes, (D-Conn.)Schrier, (D-Wash.)
    Castro, (D-Texas)Jayapal, (D-Wash.)Shalala, (D-Fla.)
    Courtney, (D-Conn.)Lee, (D-Nev.)Takano, (D-Calif.)
    Davis, S. (D-Calif.)Levin, (D-Mich.)Trahan, (D-Mass.)
    DeSaulnier, (D-Calif.)Morelle, (D-N.Y.)Trone, (D-Md.)
    Fudge, (D-Ohio)Norcross, (D-N.J.)Wild, (D-Pa.)
    Grijalva, (D-Ariz.)Omar, (D-Minn.)Wilson, F. (D-Fla.)
  • Oct. 15, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: House Education and Labor.Congressional Record p. H8143